Do Paul! Affiliate marketing is awesome – and you’re right, it can be overwhelming b/c it can be hard to know who to trust, but it’s a wonderful way to make money online — esp when you’re promoting products/services you are proud of. Let me know if you have any questions. There’s a lot I don’t know … and a lot I do. For what I don’t know, I can find the answer for you.
In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
If you decide to upgrade, you’ll be able to move your freebie domain to a full .com domain name. That domain name will cost $14/year, which is standard pricing for domains. All the content will be moved over to that domain. Hosting is included for free in your WA membership. If you decide to leave WA, you can move all your stuff to a new host whenever you want.
This is extremely helpful information for somebody who is a newbie blogger! I’ve been looking for an all inclusive “guide” to explain affiliate marketing and this is the best I’ve found. Quick question for you – when you talk about the cookie expiration date, is that from the date that you post your review/recommendation or from the date that the reader clicks on the link? For example, the affiliate links you posted in this post are well over 90 days old but if I click on one of them now and buy that product, do you still get paid? Just curious how that works.

It’d be hard for Google to argue with this content not adding value. After all, some of the guides have received close to 10,000 shares and have been used by the brands themselves to educate their own customers. Generally speaking, each guide takes about 40-50 hours to produce, and is benchmarked to beat the best existing piece of content on the topic in virtually every aspect (from design and share-ability, to page speed and on-page SEO).
Now that you know where you want to work, you need to apply. Be aware that the competition for remote positions is high. For every one job opening, there may be hundreds or thousands of applicants. But, don’t let that deter you! You can’t get a job if you don’t submit an application. Plain and simple. No one is going to magically show up on your doorstep offering you a great gig. You have to go get it.
…and the list goes on! The main thing to keep in mind is that your first website doesn't have to be perfect. It doesn't have to be a home run with your first try. I started three or four failed websites before I really got into the groove and picked a topic that worked for me. My very first websites was about horse care, and it didn't last long. My first successful website was about computer software!
Hi Matt – you need to have an affiliate disclosure on your site (we do in the footer) but you don’t have to say that in all links. Before we published the updated version of this I actually contacted Amazon support about the links on images, and they confirmed it is ok to do. For the others dealing with anchor text, check out http://marketingwithsara.com/amazon/warning-to-all-affiliate-marketers
22. Advertising – This is definitely the most old-school way of earning money with a blog. It’s also starting to become the least common way. You can sell advertising spots directly on your site or you can sign up with a company like Google AdSense or Media.net. Either way, you won’t see a whole lot of money from ads until your views are well into the thousands each day.

Add unique UTM parameters to the end of your website URL (for example: https://www.growthmarketingpro.com?utm_source=affiliate&utm_medium=affiliate-name) and just track the Source and Medium of your website conversions through Google Analytics and pay your affiliates monthly (sending them a screenshot of your Google Analytics dashboard to show proof of their traffic and conversions).


When one of our readers at The Write Life buys Chris Guillebeau’s $58 Unconventional Guide to Freelance Writing through our link, for example, we earn $29. When James Chartrand’s Damn Fine Words course sells for $1,599 through our site, we earn $200. Lots of creators offer affiliate programs for their products; the key is finding products that appeal to your audience, so you readers want to purchase them.
In February 2000, Amazon announced that it had been granted a patent[18] on components of an affiliate program. The patent application was submitted in June 1997, which predates most affiliate programs, but not PC Flowers & Gifts.com (October 1994), AutoWeb.com (October 1995), Kbkids.com/BrainPlay.com (January 1996), EPage (April 1996), and several others.[13]
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