Not only will this multiply the money you’re bringing in in a serious way, but it protects you against any sudden changes in the market or in your business. Remember that old saying about putting all your eggs in one basket? A few hours a week committed to just one or two of the following opportunities will put you in a much stronger position to be financially safe and independent.
You can even have a dedicated “deals” page on your website in your navigation menu so visitors can easily find it. Plus, sending a regular deal alert email using an auto-responder service like Aweber to make sure the people on your list get used to coming back to your site on a regular basis to find the best deals on products they're interested in.
I tried affiliate marketing years ago. Back then I was just randomly posting ads online hoping to get sales. After about 4 months I had one sale and commission was $100. Well, I gave up on it. I went to eBay, ran a successful store on there for the last 8 months, sales totaled over $2,000 and my last month I had my biggest sales in a single month at $500, then BAM, eBay killed my account. Now, today, I’m back at looking into affiliate marketing and I need help with the fine details. I think I understand the big picture, but it’s the details I need help with. So, I make a website? Specifically, do I use some free service like Wix or should I use GoDaddy, and sign up for a domain name and build a website? What do you think of, or rather, what do customers think of being on subdomains? You know websites like mystorename.majorbrand.com? I also see you mentioned writing articles, and getting ranked on Google. I’m not familiar at all with getting ranked nor do I really understand what that means. So, am I writing articles and posting them on my new website or am I writing articles, putting them somewhere online then link them to my website in hopes of generating traffic? If you could help with these concepts, I would greatly appreciate it.

A great point you made there though. Too many people try to take on too much at once and end up spreading themselves too thin – trying to conquer all the niches at the same time. Marketers also do this with advertising. Instead of sticking with one platform until they are generating a consistent number of leads they will jump from platform to platform, in essence chucking a load of crap at a wall and seeing what sticks.


Build up a following on your Instagram account and you could quickly be making extra money online. Major brands, gear companies, and even startups are willing to shell out $500-$5,000+ per post to get in front of your audience. While it’s getting harder and harder to build a massive Instagram audience, if you already have a solid niche and are posting quality content regularly with a great camera for taking Instagram photos, with a few small tweaks you can make yourself an influencer. Check out this awesome article from Shopify on how to build and grow your Instagram following to get started.
I occasionally use a MasterCard or American Express card on small purchases just to keep those accounts active. Also, I have been to the odd retailer that accepted only a certain type of credit card, so I find that having one from each major company is quite handy. Aside from my main Visa card which earns the airline points, the rest of my cards are of the “no annual fees” variety.
I already have a website and a domain name. My website is made with WordPress, and GoDaddy hosts the website. Would I have to move my website to another host, that is part of WA? Also I am thinking of keeping the website much the same way it is now(with a few changes). I already have a blog page, can I just add my links there? I have a gardening business, and I want to talk about ergonomic tools, pads, sun hats, shoes, bug spray, garden related art or jewelry, proper use of one’s body while gardening, getting the most from your gardening and achieving health and wellness through gardening. Not just the movement of digging, or hauling mulch, but with every technique I teach.
If you're ready to enter the ecommerce fray, you could sell your own stuff. Of course, along with selling your own stuff on your own website comes a whole slew of both responsibilities and technical configuration and requirements. For starters, you'll need a website and a hosting account. You'll also need a merchant account like ones offered by Stripe or PayPal. Then you'll need to design that site, build a sales funnel, create a lead magnet and do some email marketing.
I want to say thank you for taking the time to focus on useful content going into future years, as opposed to regurgitating something you read out of a hard cover marketing book from 1991. The original reason I came here however, was looking for tips / information on a general structure for paying taxes reliably on affiliate earnings in addition to disclaimer examples. Ive searched through different key word combinations and due to financial diversity on a national scale I can understand why this information is scarce. That being said, as long as a solid disclaimer is made about the information being a rough guideline etc. I think it would be extremely useful as most start up affiliates don’t know a thing about VAT, or how to separate their take home earnings from the tax they owe. I am currently residing in Alberta, Canada for your reference, but any information or a lead you could give me would be most helpful.

Affiliate marketing has grown quickly since its inception. The e-commerce website, viewed as a marketing toy in the early days of the Internet, became an integrated part of the overall business plan and in some cases grew to a bigger business than the existing offline business. According to one report, the total sales amount generated through affiliate networks in 2006 was £2.16 billion in the United Kingdom alone. The estimates were £1.35 billion in sales in 2005.[19] MarketingSherpa's research team estimated that, in 2006, affiliates worldwide earned US$6.5 billion in bounty and commissions from a variety of sources in retail, personal finance, gaming and gambling, travel, telecom, education, publishing, and forms of lead generation other than contextual advertising programs.[20]
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